William Tyndale – Gifted or Driven? 3 Keys to Language Acquisition…

According to David Daniell, “William Tyndale gave us our English Bible” (Daniell, 1). Half of the OT and the full NT of the 1611 King James (or Authorized Version) Bible was 90% Tyndale’s work. My wife and I are reading through David Daniell’s William Tyndale, A Biography. I want to kick things off with a(…)

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Should We Translate the Bible?

Introduction to the Septuagint and the Vernaculars, by M. Jinbachian Muslims require adherents to learn to read (or at least recite) Arabic if they want to read the Qur’an. Roman Catholics, leading up to and during the Counter-Reformation to the Protestant Reformations of the 16th and 17th centuries, advocated that the Roman Catholic Church is(…)

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Evangelism, Orality, and Bible Translation

Introduction to the Septuagint and the Vernaculars, by M. Jinbachian Covering the Arabic translations during the 8th-16th c., of the Arab Islamic Empire, Jinbachian notes something fascinating about early translation work among oral peoples. On whether there was an Arabic translation of the Bible before the rise of Islam, Jinbachian writes, “It is doubtful because(…)

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Fidelity: Walking a Tightrope

Introduction to the Septuagint and the Vernaculars, by M. Jinbachian “Bible translation in the early centuries began as literal translation (verbum e verbo), though not slavishly literal, and today we find that it has often changed to becoming a sensus de sensu or meaning-based translation” (Noss, 34). The LXX: In the middle of the 3rd century B.C.E.,(…)

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An Obligation to Understand AND to Translate

Introduction to “A History of Bible Translation,” edited by Philip Noss Noss points out that it is better to talk of translation method than of translation theory or communication theory, because Bible translation is a theological endeavor (Noss, 13). D. A. Carson has also made the point that translators need more than linguistic training, see(…)

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